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Catch Wrestling’s Flying Mare – And Follow Ups

Many times what you see in our articles and videos is the culmination of years of work, repetition and refinement. But that final product sometimes looks quite different when we first encounter it. And this has to do with many factors. First is how familiar or unfamiliar the technique is to us. Then there is how and where the technique began and then how we use the move, which can be quite different. For instance, techniques developed in arts that include pinning or outlaw leg locks will create energies and common pathways that simply will not exist in our world, and as a result, we will use a given technique in a completely different way than how it was used in it’s original home.

So we thought we’d do something a little different with this article. We wanted to include you in the process, from the beginning. We wanted to show you how we learn a new move, the questions we ask, the process we go through in stumbling through it, fleshing it out, trying to make it fit into what we are doing and the rule structures that we play by. We wanted you to see us make fools of ourselves (even more than usual), ask “stupid” questions and collaborate with friends. And so here it is, our first encounter with Catch As Catch Can’s Flying Mare.

Our story begins a few years back, during one of Coach Billy Robinson’s last seminars. Brandon and I learned the Flying Mare through him and brought it back to our gym. Kiser took to the move a little more than I did and began to teach it to our student body. I had reservations about teaching it since I didn’t understand the entire picture and didn’t have a chance to ask Coach Billy about a failsafe should the move get countered. Years later, our students had developed to a point where the move was popping up in their rolls and competitions. Sometimes working perfectly, and other times getting stuffed hard! And then the question came, “What do we do, when we’ve committed to the Flying Mare, and the opponent stops it?”

And this is where the story picks back up again. A few years after Coach Billy’s passing and with the following Facebook messages between Coach Sam Kressin and I attempting to reverse engineer what we think Coach Billy might say and suggest.

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BYamasakiSKressinMessages3And this is what we’ve got up to this point.  A month into the conversation with Catch Wrestler Sam Kressin.  Now before we go out and publish this first draft of the article, I’d like to stray off topic just a little and mention a story I once heard about American Kenpo’s Founder Ed Parker.  Towards the end of his life, Master Parker knew that his days were numbered.  He had also seen what could happen to a family, an organization, once a leader had departed.  He had seen the in fighting and politics that could erupt and decimate a lifetime of work.  And so he set out with a plan.

The story goes that Master Parker sought out his highest ranking students and with each, only shared a portion of the advanced material, seeking to create specialists in particular branches of his art.  His hope was that after his passing, his students would have to come together and share with each other to maintain the complete version of his life’s work.  Whether or not this story is true, it made a permanent impact on me.

And so, what I would love to see, is feedback from the rest of our friends from Coach Billy’s school.  To see, if together, we can reverse engineer our failures, and piece together a more complete understanding of how Coach Billy would have dealt with the situations we are finding ourselves in.  And so I invite you personally, Jesse Mares, John Potenza, Jake Shannon and Garry Davis to join Sam, Brandon and I in our efforts to unravel this mystery.  Please add your comments, send us your videos, we will incorporate them all here in this article and will learn from each other and grow closer through the process.

Check back as all new video and insight will be updated to this page as we receive it.  And thank you for supporting DamageControlMMA.com!

Foot Sweeps For MMA, Muay Thai, and Submission Wrestling

Study the Martial Arts long enough and eventually, you’ll begin to realize just how long it can take some times to learn a certain set of skills. I have been a huge fan of foot sweeps for years and as a result am perpetually on the hunt for different entries, set ups, details and insights regarding this valuable tool.

What I enjoy so much about the foot sweep is that it is so versatile while at the same time being a low risk, high reward technique. Foot sweeps can be used as takedowns, as set ups for submissions or my favorite, as set ups for the Knee.

Here I get a rare opportunity to learn foot sweeps from one of my all time favorite instructors, Ajarn Greg Nelson from “The Academy” in Minneapolis Minnesota. Ajarn Greg was the first instructor to introduce me to the idea of using sweeps as off balancing techniques to set up knees. I’ve been exploring that idea ever since and enjoying every minute of it.

Please leave a comment and let me know what you think about using foot sweeps as takedowns, and as set ups for submissions or knees. Which do you prefer? What are your favorite follow ups for foot sweeps?

CACC Single Leg Suplex!

Catch As Catch Can Living Legend Billy Robinson is back again, and this time he’s helping Assistant Coach Sam and Ricky Lazaro refine a Kick Catch/Single Leg Suplex variation.

When I first met Coach Robinson, I had a few brief moments to just sit and talk with him. Well, when I say, “talk” what I really mean is, sit and listen. And during my listening, I recall him reiterating the idea of “Learning how to learn.” A concept given to him by his mentor Billy Riley.

I don’t know how many times I expect to use this particular series of moves in my own game, but there is plenty here to learn. Various concepts of leverage and body mechanics; general principles that I have extracted from this lesson and have begun to apply to techniques more suited to my personal style of Submission Wrestling and MMA.

I’d like to believe that I’ve begun to “learn how to learn.” And in so doing have learned how to look beyond what is directly in front of me. To see the driving principles that make the techniques work and then apply them to improve techniques that lie elsewhere in my repertoire. This has happened before with ideas taught to me by Mike Diaz in regards to butterfly guard, arm control and sweeps. To this day I am not a big butterfly guard player, but the lessons taught to me that day have improved my standing clinch game, my guard passing game and closed guard game.

And thus, I encourage you to look at your lessons, to watch your videos and to try to get just a little more out of them that what is immediately in the foreground. Look deeper and do your best to learn how to learn. Maybe I’ve got a little foothold (pun intended) into “Learning how to learn” or maybe I still haven’t got a clue. Either way, it can’t hurt to keep trying.

On a separate note, and I apologize for the abrupt and complete change of topics here, but as I’ve watched this season of The Ultimate Fighter (Team Rousey vs Team Tate), I couldn’t help but notice a few familiar faces. Jessamyn Duke, who is from Ajarn Chai’s Thai Boxing Association and is actually an Associate Instructor, and Shayna Baszler who I recognized, and this is why I bring this up, from a video with Coach Billy at one of the Catch Certifications.

I’ve never trained along side of Shayna, but as I’ve watched her interact with her fellow house mates. Last week, taking Japanese language lessons from Roxanne Modafferi, and then comforting her after her loss, I couldn’t help but become endeared by her plight.

Her journey was cut short with an upset loss to Julianna Pena, but I wish her the best and I hope to share the mat someday, perhaps, if I am lucky, under the watchful eye of Coach Robinson at a Catch Certifiaction.

Muay Thai Lower Leg Kick – A Knock Down Waiting to Happen

Feast your eyes on this super fans! A blast from that past. An awesome clip from the primordial soup known as Taking It To The MMAT. The precursor to what you see before you now, in it’s current and more refined iteration, Damage Control MMA.

This was a clip I shot at Ajarn Surachai Sirisute’s Annual Pacific Northwest Muay Thai Camp circa 2008 (I think). It was during a time I focused an entire year on learning and developing the sweep kick and all its variations. Khuen Khru Scott Anderson, now the Northeast Regional Director of the Thai Boxing Association of the USA, was kind enough to share this awesome technique with me and to this day it is one of my favorites, and one that serves me well any time I square off with a hard hitting bubba who loads up heavy on that lead foot and tries to drop bombs.

What made me think of it was the sweep used by Benson Henderson as he fought Gilbert Melendez at UFC on Fox 7. And I wanted to share it with you because this clip made it’s debut during our Cable Television days and thus didn’t get as many views on Youtube as I felt it deserved.

But Benson Henderson isn’t the only UFC champion who makes use of this most excellent technique, so does Lyoto Machida. Granted he usually uses a foot sweep variation as opposed to a shin induced post remover, but the concept and physics are the same. Now you too can put your opponents down like a peg legged pirates on an ice skating rink.

Lyoto Machida uses a similar technique. However, he favors using the bottom of the foot rather than the shin to remove his opponent’s lead leg post.

I take pride in knowing that we’ve shared this video with our loyal fans and supporters years before it became more widely known as a result of the Ultimate Fighting Championships. I apologize for the background music as this was edited early on in my video making experience. As you can see, over time we phased out that part of the production and I wish I could remove it from this clip as I feel it detracts from Khuen Khru Scott’s instruction.

But nevertheless, it is a proud piece of Damage Control MMA history.

Now go out there and kick somebody!

Arm Drag Trip Takedown with Olympic Gold Medalist and UFC Veteran Mark Schultz

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Short and sweet, just like this post, the Arm Drag Trip is a quick and easy takedown to learn and use. We’ve had some great success combining it with our Universal Set Up series and Progressive Striking to Takedowns.

There are so many different ways to set it up as we learned at the Mark Schultz seminar at the Ultimate Combat Training Center earlier this year. Hopefully, you’ll find as many uses for this great technique as we have.

Enjoy!

MMA and its JKD roots

Years ago a great man wanted to see what was possible if the restrictions of classical system and tradition were replaced by the philosophy of “no way as way, no limitation as the only limitation”

That man was Bruce Lee and the sporting permutation of his vision is what we know today as MMA. At the technical level, Bruce Lee’s art is known for its ability to seamlessly transition from one art or range to another. Something that MMA professionals are only now just beginning to realize and incorporate.

One of our favorite nods to the JKD tradition is the use of the shuffle step kick entry. In the members area of our website we elaborate further on the variations and possibilities we like to use but here you can see how we’ve applied the basic concept to the realm of MMA.

The key for using this entry is to consistently mix your dedicated striking attacks using the shuffle kick entry with your compound takedown attacks. Again something we cover at length for our members.

Until next time, “Take what is useful, discard what is useless and add what is essentially your own”. Leave a comment and let us know what you’ve found useful.

MMA Striking Techniques – CSW Style

Some videos more or less speak for themselves. This is one of them. Ben “The Badger” Jones, puts some mojo on Coach Kiser during the 2011 CSW Fighter and Instructor’s Camp.

Jaw Breakers, Liver Shots and Sweep Kicks abound.

Ahhhh, I love being the camera man sometimes.

MMA Training Beyond Your Own Horizons

Recently Coach Kiser and I had an old friend stop by for some mitt work and conditioning for an upcoming fight he had here in Utah.

That friend was none other than TUF Contestant and Pit Bull Attack Survivor, Kyacey Uscola.

Between training sessions, Kyacey shared with us some of his favorite tricks he’s picked up during his time out in Sacramento while training with Urijah Faber and Team Alpha Male.

I always enjoy the opportunity to see what’s going on in other parts of the MMA world, especially when they come from teams whos style has as much contrast to our own as Team Alpha Male’s does.

It’s always good to come in contact with new ideas.

Whether you choose to adopt them in their original form as we have (for the most part) with the “Sixes” circuit that we picked up fom former Team Quest Member and Extreme Couture coach Dennis Davis (Kiser replaced the Olympic Bar with Kettle Bells), or to modify them to suit your needs is up to you.

You may even decide to completely avoid the exercises, techniques and tactics you see being used in other camps. But even then, you do so with the benefit of knowing what’s going on beyond your own horizons, and what others are doing to prepare for a battle they may some day wage with you.

At any rate, I urge you to look beyond your own MMA horizons and explore other ideas and possibilities.

Until next time… Happy Hunting!

Muay Thai Technique: Cut Kick Counter To The Teep

This is a great technique that I picked up at the 2009 Pacific Northwest Muay Thai Camp. There is so much information there and the instructors are simply the best. I got a bunch of incredible techniques even outside of the wealth of information given to us druing the regular sessions… and this was one of them.

I’ve been working on this dump for some time now, but I’ve never seen the the Partner Preservation aspect I picked up which was really cool! A special thanks to Khuen Khru Ian Alexander out of Virginia Beach Virginia for sharing this with us. If you’re ever in that neck of the woods, you’d be doing yourself a favor to checking out their world class facility.

Now, happy dumping!

Body Lock Suplex

Coach Chris Wells completes his takedown Trifecta (aka the Wellian Menage-A-Toire) with the body lock suplex counter to the Judo hip throw (O-Goshi). This is a one of a kind look at a beautiful takedown technician. For more information on seminars and workshops with Pedro Sauer Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Black Belt and takedown specialist Chris Wells, please contact Mushin Self Defense at instructor@mushinselfdefense.com