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Arm Lock from 50/50 Guard – A Leg Lock Counter

Have you ever been caught in the 50/50 Guard or a Leg Locking War and either lost the battle or been locked into an indefinite stalemate? Maybe this might give you a few new ideas and strategies to turn the tide in your favor.

The key points to being successful when using these strategies are as follows:

1. Your primary focus should be on Defense! Dedicate your hands to defending your legs.
2. Extend your caught leg and rotate it so that your heel is hidden behind your opponent’s lat.
3. After dominating the hand fighting, use your legs to then obtain control over your opponent’s dominant attacking arm.

Stay safe, have fun and let us know how this little tick is working for you in the comments below.

Billy Robinson – Catch Wrestling Standing Posture Break

Is there a better way to ring in the new year than another quality video by the Legendary King of Catch, Coach Billy Robinson? And with it, what would the first post of 2013 be without my new years resolution.

Last year I stated I wanted to do a video on the F=MA equation and how it pertained to the striking arts. Well, that kind of fell by the way side (I’m still interested but there just didn’t seem like there was a lot of viewer demand). But I also wanted to bring more Brazilian Jiu-jitsu into the project and I feel like I made good on that commitment.

This year I’m committed to keeping our balanced approach to the arts coming to our viewers. But more so my resolution is to continue to educate people in the similarities and mutual beauty that can be found in the arts rather than fixating on the minor differences.

This video is a great example of this. If you look carefully, you can just see the Jiu-jitsu in this Catch move, or perhaps you could say you can see the Catch in the Jiu-jitsu mentality. The two are so fundamentally similar at times who’s to say which is which. But in essence, the question is, what happens if your opponent resists having his head pulled down and responds by pulling back?

Coach Robinson’s answer is to go with their effort and push their head back, creating an off balance in the rear quadrant and setting up the dreaded Double Wrist Lock.

What similarities have you found between the various arts? Leave your insights in the comments below.

The Single Leg and Double Leg change of angle Takedown Chain

What an absolute treat to have my friend and takedown mentor Chris Wells come and share his continuation of a whole series he began teaching over five years ago. As was the case with our previous article, this one is concept driven, as if it wasn’t already cool enough.

For those of you unfamiliar with the backbone of our takedown series from the over under 50/50 clinch, a great deal of it is based on attacks to the leg nearest us which usually occurs on our overhook side.

Below is the Spiral Takedown, note Coach Well’s left hand and how it taps at the inner thigh of the leg nearest him on his overhook side:

Next up is the Knee Tap Takedown, notice again, the tap occurs with Coach Well’s left hand on the leg closest to him on his overhook side:

The third piece of the first section of the basic over/under takedown series is the Body Lock Takedown. After this we either transition into the Whizzar series, or can attack the far side (underhook side) leg which we will address in this post. But still, it is important to notice that again, the attack occurs on Coach Well’s overhook side, moving toward the leg and hip that are nearest to him.

The premise of this new series, offered in the featured video at the top of this page is to address how one might attack the leg on our underhook side. It is important to develop attacks on both sides of the body. This is so because as your opponent defends one side, he begins to offer the other. This is the case in striking as well as submissions or in this case takedowns.

The concept driving this whole series, is a constant change of direction and angles of attack. This allows you to take the initiative and keep it, while your opponent attempts to stay on his feet, always 1 step behind what you have in store for him until eventually, the onslaught is simply too much and he eventually is taken to the ground.

If you enjoyed this series and would like a to lear a little more about what our guests have shown us in terms of takedowns, you might enjoy one of our previous articles it is a collection of closely related takedowns from the likes of Coach Robinson, Ajarn Greg Nelson and UFC fighter Nick Diaz. I’ve put them together in one spot because they all seem to play off of each other. You can find them at http://damagecontrolmma.com/2009/06/a-solid-clinch-game-for-takedowns-and-submissions/

Weigh in and let us know if you liked this article and would like to see more from Coach Chris Wells.

The MMA Takedown Breakdown: The How of Pressure

This post is equal parts concept and technique. The concept being, to continually pressure with real time, technique revisions and adjustments that will result in the most efficient means of accomplishing your goal… achieving a takedown in an MMA fight.

Phew! That was a mouthful. Restated and in simpler terms, sure, you could just drop in on a double and claw your way towards a takedown. Then again, you may just be clawing your way towards premature exhaustion and ultimately spinning your wheels.

But when you initiate an attack and are prepared to quickly adjust and circumvent the defense your opponent may throw up, perhaps repeating this sequence until your objectives are achieved; you make your opponent’s job that much more difficult, and thus, your job that much easier.

This concept of continual forward pressure, while phasing through various levels (high/head, mid/body, low/hips-legs) and types (takedown, clinching, striking) of attack is great, but just as important is the HOW, or the techniques best suited for applying this concept. That is what this video is all about.

Do you have to use the techniques that we’ve presented here verbatim? No, not at all, but these particular techniques are great examples of how to effect the concept of varied, constant pressure.

Do you always have to finish against a wall or cage? Of course not. There are plenty of situations where you may not be in a cage or enclosed area. Maybe your fight is in a ring, or maybe we’re talking a self defense situation in an open arena. You might want to incorporate some of the techniques presented in our over under clinch series with Coach Chris Wells.

Finally, are the cage takedowns presented in the above video the only ways to finish while against the fence? Absolutely not, it’s just a starting point. We’ve shown you plenty of options in our other videos regarding this subject, which we’ll include below for good measure.

Here are some additional cage takedown defense ideas for you.

Brazilian Jiu-jitsu: Standing Guard Passes

Got a case of the Mondays? Never fear, the good Doctor is here and I have yet another feel good prescription for you. Let’s just pretend it’s Wednesday shall we. I invite you to join along for my Wednesday afternoon ritual.

Every Wednesday I head out to the Bernales Institute of Martial Arts for a weekly dose of Brazilian Jiu-jitsu and a hearty helping of Humble Pie.

This week, we took a look at a few standing Guard Passes. I apologize for the informal feel to the video but I was there for my lesson first, and to capture it on video second. This was exactly what we covered in my lesson and Khuen Khru Will was kind enough to let us film it and share it with all of you.

Enjoy!

Half Guard: The Erik Paulson Template

I’m not the sharpest pencil in the box. As a result, I need simple toggle switches, on – off decision making inputs to make my grappling computations easier. For my computer science friends, and deductive logic cronies, you will understand what I mean when I say, I try to build my grappling life around the conditional “If this, then that… If that, then this.”

Have I lost you yet? Probably, but I will continue anyway. You see, for me, I use simple conditionals to determine where I will move next while in the grappling world. For instance, on a Double Leg Takedown, “If I am able to lock my hands just beneath my opponent’s butt cheeks, I continue on to finish the Double.” “If I am unable to secure a locked hand grip, I switch to a single or simply abort, and reset.”

Others will argue that there are a myriad of placements for your hands during a double. But I like the locked grip version because it presents me with the simple decision making input I spoke of earlier. If grip is locked up, then proceed with takedown, if not, then don’t. Simple decision making for a slow, dumb oaf like myself.

What does this have to do with Erik Paulson’s Half Guard Template? Good question. For my game, I had a series of options for when on bottom, with the half guard and an underhook on the side where I had captured my opponent’s leg. For example if I had half guard on my opponent’s right leg, I had and underhook beneath my opponent’s right arm.

BUT, I didn’t have such a clear cut set of options for when my opponent had an underhook on his trapped leg side, forcing me to take an overhook. That is, if I had my opponent’s right leg trapped, but was forced to take an overhook on my opponent’s right arm I wasn’t sure what the best course of action was, so I asked Sensei Paulson what he liked to do in this case and he offered the above Template.

What I gleaned from the series was quite simple and effective and I have since implemented it into my game and my series of simple on – off, toggle switches. In my sling bladed internal dialog it sounds something like this. “If you have an overhook on the trapped leg side, bridge and turn, transition to a half butterfly guard, then transition to a full butterfly guard or switch to a half guard on the opposite leg where you should end up with an underhook on the trapped leg side.”

Do you have any simple guidelines and reference points which allow for quick, easy decision making while rolling? If so, we’d love to hear them in the comments area.

Thanks for visiting and stay tuned for more DamageControlMMA.com!

MMA Techniques In Real Fights: Southpaw Fighting

When you watch a technique video online and read the comments it can be difficult to tell which if any are legit and whether or not the technique will really work.

This can be the case especially if you haven’t had a chance to build up a solid foundation and understanding through experience.

Naysayers will argue, “That will never work, because all you’d have to do is blah blah.” There are times when these arguments have merit and others when such claims are baseless.

So how do you know which claims to believe?

Well one way is to simply watch the techniques being used in actual fights.

And that is exactly what we present to you this week on Damage Control MMA. Earlier this year we presented our members with a 16 video instructional on How to Counter a Southpaw and shared a few of the clips with the public in our blog post on the subject.

As you can see in the video above, it doesn’t need to be fancy, hard to learn, or overly complex to be effective. And that’s what we specialize in here at DamageControlMMA.com Bringing our members, simple, easy to learn, effective techniques that give results.

Let the naysayers type on. 90% of them talk loud and say nothing. They never present original, informative material of their own. They’ve never posted any videos let alone competed, or shown proof of their expertise in fights of their own or through their student body.

You have our guarantee that whenever possible we will show you our techniques being applied, personally or by our fighters/students whenever possible. We’ve done it since the beginning and will continue to do so throughout the life of this project.

If you’ve experienced good results with our techniques, or even seen examples of techniques we’ve taught used effectively in fights, please let us know in the comments below.

 

Happy Hunting!

UK MMA: Dan Hardy Boxing Combination

The power of the Martial Arts to bring people together, to forge bonds and foster new friendships is nearly unparalleled in my opinion. Next week we will be sharing a proof of concept video demonstrating the use of techniques we’ve shared here on DamageControlMMA.com in actual fights. It is our way of showing that actions speak louder than words.

In addition to a ton of support and positive feedback, we’ve also received our fair share of insults and negative comments. For the most part we’ve got pretty thick skins. We rarely give any thought to these types of attacks. Experience has taught us that friends can do you much more good than you can ever harm an enemy. Which is another way of saying, with a limited amount of time on this earth, and a limited energy, you can choose to spend them contributing to the abyss of hatred and negativity, or you can use them to cultivate positive mojo and to add goodness to this world.

Damage Control MMA Member Robert Carlin is a perfect example of the latter. Over the years we’ve forged a friendship and now, we are all reaping the benefits, the positive vibrations and goodness that he and his team at Antonine MMA has decided to share with us. An awesome clip with UFC Veteran Dan Hardy who demonstrates a slick Boxing Combination.

Remember, you can use your powers to make more happiness on this earth, or you can use them to create more despair. Robert has used his to create more happiness and for that I am grateful. Thank you good friend. We wish you and your team, much happiness and many good days.

Live long Damage Controllers and be excellent to one and other.

The Gi Choke Defense They’ll Never See Coming!

Tired of getting garroted every time you put on a Gi? I know the feeling. For me the Gi is like wrestling with a Tar Baby (does anybody but me even remember that story?) Yeah that’s me, Brer Rabbit hopping down the grappling trail when Wham! All of a sudden you can’t get away from your opponent’s clutches and the next thing you know, you’re being put to sleep with a piece of your own clothing.

I had heard about an interesting and unconventional way to give yourself an extra life if caught in the dreaded collar choke. Kiser had mentioned some strange defense he had encountered while trying to choke our mutual friend, Dan Berry. Being the technique collector that I am, I had to see this unusual move and learn more about it.

I figured I might as well bring you along and let you see it with me for the first time. Have I put it to the test? No, but Kiser said it stopped him from completing his choke and Dan says it’s saved his neck on more than one occasion. So I figure it’s worth a look.

I encourage you, my friends to join me in R&Ding this thing to see if it’s a worth while endeavor. Let us know how it works for you in the comments below.

Muay Thai Knee Set Up Combination

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A friend of mine once expressed that, in his humble opinion, the keys to being a good Martial Artist were quite similar to those involved with being a good Magician. He must have sensed my lack of comprehension as he continued to explain himself. The essence of pulling off any trick is misdirection.

Whether this is accomplished with the beautiful and scantily clad assistant, hand gestures or smoke and mirrors is all just a matter of how you want to accomplish this. Mercifully neither Kiser nor I are scantily clad and neither of us has employed smoke or mirrors… yet, but we certainly do our share of misdirecting our opponents. Whether it’s attacking the neck in order to secure a submission on someone’s arm or as in the case of this video, drawing our opponent’s attention to their head so that we can access his ribs, spleen or liver with our knee, the concept applies.

Look left, go right. Touch high, go low. Squeeze the wrist to twist the foot. The concept is basic and when applied, you will make your own kind of magic on the mats. No go out there and get David Blain on your friends.