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Lesson 31: Deconstruction of the Footwork

Deconstructing the Footwork-HD 720p from Dr. Sick on Vimeo.

Footwork is the most effective method of defense. And therefore, it is by its very nature, the most difficult to deconstruct. It can be done, but realize going into it, that your success rates will not be as high as in the previous Deconstruction Series.

Be sure to share your experiences, add comments or ask questions in the discussion forum.

Lesson 28: Deconstruction of the Cover

Deconstructing the Cover-HD 720p from Dr. Sick on Vimeo.

After mastering the material in Phase 2 and applying it to your opponent, it is not uncommon for them to develop a level of timidity. When this occurs it is time to transition to Phase 3. Deconstructing their defense. This begins with Deconstructing the Cover.

Essentially, Deconstruction entails a light, fast, uncommitted probe to determine what your opponent’s initial, or preferred defense is. This is followed immediately with a Deconstruction of the given defense.

Phase 3 can also be used to defeat Phase 2 in most cases.

Be sure to share your experiences, add comments or ask questions in the discussion forum.

Lesson 27: Phase 2 Review and Summary

Phase 2 Summary-HD 720p from Dr. Sick on Vimeo.

Here we discuss the application of all the tools you’ve amassed in the Phase 2 series of techniques. In this first video we go over the idea of spending time to invest in a counter. Which is not to say that you can’t immediately counter your opponent on the first beat, every time they attack. But if you do you will simply need to be prepared to employ a strong Phase 3 skill set which involves attacking as opposed to counter attacking.

The purpose of the video is to offer a subtler and crafty approach at countering your opponent. Think of it as playing possum on the grand scale.

Phase 2 Summary Part 2-HD 720p from Dr. Sick on Vimeo.

This second video is an addendum to the first. In it we talk about how to use your various defenses to draw in your opponent based on their unique chase instincts. Some will be drawn in by retreating footwork, others will ignore your footwork and be tempted by your parry defenses. Still others will be cautious and timid when shown footwork and parries, but commit when you employ a cover style defense. And some will be lured into your trap from the elusive head.

There will be times where you need to combine all the elements but most times you will find a opponent will favor attacking one particular form of defense over another. It is your job to stay safe, circle out and test your opponent until you find their particular poison. Then disguise when you are using it and make them pay!

Be sure to share your experiences, add comments or ask questions in the discussion forum.

Lesson 18: Scoop and Counter

Here in Phase 2 you are introduced to a second defense against the Teep, the Shelf/Handshake. In addition you are drill countering based on the three variations of Teep Defense (Scoop, Shelf, and Handshake). Remember that creating a safe and friendly training environment and culture, ultimately rests on your shoulders.

We encourage you to weigh the benefits of training with full sweeps and dumps with the costs and develop a training methodology that best fits your situation.

Be sure to share your experiences, add comments or ask questions in the discussion forum.

Lesson 14: Cover and Counter Set

Hopefully you are beginning to see the trend here. Learn the basic defenses, then use the basic defenses to set up your counters. There are multiple possible counters off of each defense, but the ones we’ve offered here are easily executed, high percentage, and low risk.

Be sure to share your experiences, add comments or ask questions in the discussion forum.

Lesson 12: Phase 1 Evade and Defend

Now that you have the foundation of our striking techniques laid, it’s important to understand the big picture.  Not just how to do a technique but rather, when to do a particular technique.  Understanding our 4 phased approach is paramount to  accomplishing this.

In Phase 1 you will use your footwork, hand defenses and occasionally a fading elusive head to stay safe, avoid, evade and defend against your opponent.  You should be focused only on defense at this point.  Do not allow your opponent to hit you.  Stay far enough away that you cannot be touched the majority of the time.  When possible you will make enough space to set up in your Kick Stance and prepare to counter.

The 4 Phases go in the following order:

  1. Phase 1:  Evade and Defend.  Make enough space to set up in Kick Stance.  Opponent should have to take at least 1 step to reach you with any attack
  2. Phase 2: Counter.  Attack your opponent’s bridge step.  Or Cover and Counter, Parry and Counter, Move your Head and Counter, Scoop and Counter, Or Shield and Counter
  3. Phase 3: Deconstruct.  When your opponent ceases to advance for fear of being countered.  Begin your attack.  First with a probe then follow by Deconstructing their defense
  4. Phase 4: Re-counter.  If your opponent begins to back up (using Phase 1 to set you up for a Phase 2 Counter), you must stutter your way in and attempt to Counter his Counter

But in order to all the above, you must first master and be completely competent and confident in your ability to execute Phase 1 Evade and Defend.

Ask questions, discuss ideas and experiences in the forum here.

Lesson 8: Scoop vs Teep

Generally it is a bad idea to drop your hands.  But in the case of the Teep Defense, you are usually far enough away that if something goes wrong or doesn’t feel right, you can defer to the old stand by, when in doubt, circle out.

Ask questions, discuss ideas and experiences in the forum here.

Lesson 4: 8 Count Cover Set

There are a few situations where you will want or need to use hand defenses to handle an incoming attack.  Keep in mind that footwork will always trump any other type of pure defense.  But there are circumstances, such as limited space (a small ring, or cage, a office cubicle, elevator or living room), or when you are tired or have a leg injury that limits your movement that may call for hand defenses.

As your defensive skills improve you will gain confidence and you will begin to wade into the edges of your opponent’s effective striking range, this is sometimes necessary to draw your opponent out and set him/her up for a counter.

The Cover Set teaches you the basics of Covering Up whatever it is that your opponent is trying to hit.  They all rely on your Boxing Stance as foundation.  If you’re not angled properly, you will be knocked back and will be unable to counter.  If you’re feet are too narrow you will be knocked sideways and again will be unable to counter, in which you would have been better off simply moving your feet and resetting rather than covering up, taking a hit and failing to counter.

Ask questions, discuss ideas and experiences in the forum here.