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How to Street Fight 101

A slight departure from the beaten path here at Damage Control MMA, we are proud to share with you our very first, Street Fighting Style video.

Actually, Street Fighting is more the general arena where you might use these types of tools. The art is known as Panantukan or Philippine Style Boxing.

How Different is MMA from Street Fighting?

I say slight departure, and yet, the way Guru Sullivan taught, was very familiar and easy to assimilate into the Boxing, MMA, CSW, and Muay Thai fighting methods that we specialize in. And it makes sense when you think about it. I mean, how much different is putting your fist on someone’s chin than putting your finger into their eye from a purely mechanical standpoint. Both take timing, set up and placement. But aside from that if I can punch you, I can put my finger in your eye. If I can grab your head for a Muay Thai Style Clinch, I can grab a fist full of hair and yank your head down for a knee. If I can catch you with an inside leg kick, a slight change of angle and I’m kicking a field goal with two balls and splitting the uprights.

Martial Arts or Concealed Carry?

As was discussed in our article “I Know Smith and Wesson” the debate over the practical merits of Martial Arts in a world filled with Concealed Carry Permits is never ending and continues to rage on. But I still believe that those of us with Martial Skill will always have more options and more flexibility (in terms of the force continuum) than those who simply go out and buy a gun. And no one said that you can’t learn how to be a weapon as well as be an expert at using one.

Walking The Dog… A Case Study In Time To Deployment

But take a recent experience of my own as an example. As a proud new owner of a rescued Dog, I was taking him out for our nightly walk. It was late, I had just finished up teaching at the gym. I came home, showered, grabbed some chow and by the time we hit the pavement it was about 11:30 pm. About half way through our walk we turned a corner and BAM!!! 5 or so Belgian Manlinois type dogs charged us from out of the darkness. They were off leash and before I could think one launched itself at my new pup, mouth gaping, fangs glinting in the moonlight. I was carrying pepper spray, a tactical flashlight and all manner of other types of defensive gear, but there was no time to deploy any of it.

Instead, without hesitation, a Muay Thai Teep came flying from my right leg, catching the lunging canine mid air and sending him 3 feed sideways. After deflecting the malicious mut, Boone Dog (my Boxer) and I found ourselves surrounded by 4 other dogs. There was no escape route. But by this time I was able to grasp the pepper spray that was in the front pocket of my hoodie. I spun and circled somehow keeping the other dogs at bay when finally their owner lumbered over from his yard across the street and helped to get a handle on the situation.

A commenter on the Smith and Wesson post claimed to be able to draw and fire his sub compact 9 mm in under 1 second. If he were in my place we’d be talking about a dead dog or two, perhaps some collateral damage, and some face time with the local sheriff’s department. As it was, no one was injured in the situation, not even the dog. I used more of a push kick than one designed to injure. We all walked away and went home that night. The only casualty was my pair of soiled tighty whities and my neighbors lawn which received a free fertilization from Boone who also felt the immediate urge to empty his bowels.

The Flexibility of Martial Skill

The point is, Martial Arts still have a very practical and important role to play in defensive tactics and street self defense. Whether you train in arts designed specifically for this purpose or those with more “sport” orientation, they will all contribute to better coordination, timing, distance, awareness, and fighting spirit. What I liked about Guru Sullivan’s training methods were how they used training tools like the focus mitts, something we use in Muay Thai, MMA and CSW on a daily basis to incorporate things like head butts and sweeps. I liked how the Panantukan used techniques we were already familiar with like “The Bob” as a head butt. Instead of having to learn something completely new, we simply applied something we were already used to in a slightly different way. Instead of simply dodging a punch, we were now, dodging a punch and “accidentally” clipping our opponent in the face with the top of our heads. It was a ton of fun and very empowering to think that we already had a solid foundation for self defense, we just needed to start thinking about it in a different way.

Don’t believe me? Check out this clip of some Submission Grappling being applied in a street altercation.

So if you’re looking to learn more about how to take your MMA Tool Set on to the mean streets, be sure to visit www.ErikPaulson.com and check out the Panantukan DVD’s by Guru Sullivan and let them know the guys from DamageControlMMA sent you.

The Anatomy of the Muay Thai MMA Leg Kick and Beyond

The Muay Thai Leg Kick has always held a special place in my heart.

One’s ultimate goal when fighting should always be to break the spirit of your opponent. When you knock someone out they have no choice in the matter. Their spirit is momentarily turned off. When you tap someone out, they realize that the smart move is to live to fight another day. But when you take someone out with a Leg Kick, they are perfectly conscious and aware. They can continue to fight if they want to.

Most times, they choose not to because of the excruciating pain and this is the moment that their spirit breaks.

How do I know this you ask? I’ve been there, on the receiving end, a couple of times.

The following is an in depth look at the anatomical structure of the nerves and muscles in the leg and the most efficient ways to render them inoperable. In addition we have included several set ups, combinations and techniques for using the information provided by the anatomical study.

As a side note, we learned from Dr. Cacciamani that there are two ways to cripple and immobilize the leg. 1 is an attack to the primary nerve structures (e.g. the Sciatic Nerve) and 2 is an attack on the muscle tissue. From our research, the difference is generally that nerve attacks immediately cause the temporary loss of control for the limb. Whereas muscle tissue attacks cause swelling, cramping/knotting, and gradual deterioration of muscle function.

This makes sense if you think about it. You can take out the structures that send messages to and from a muscle/group of muscles or you can pulverize the muscle itself. Bottom line is, if your opponent can’t or doesn’t want to move his/her leg anymore, you’ve pretty much done the job.

Included are some diagrams for reference. And below that are a series of videos showing how we like to apply the information we’ve learned from Dr. Cacciamani and from our independent research.

Anterior Neuromuscular Anatomy of Human Leg

Anterior Neuromuscular Anatomy of Human Leg

Posterior Neuromuscular Anatomy of Human Leg

Posterior Neuromuscular Anatomy of Human Leg

You can watch them in any order you wish, but

I have tried to assemble them in a loosely organized fashion in hopes that our readers will see how the various techniques can be used to compliment each other

and to form a catch all for reactions, energies, and defenses to any one particular attack.

Top View of Fascia and Nerves in Human Leg

Top View of Fascia and Nerves in Human Leg

Due to time constraints, I have initially included only 5 additional clips in this article. I will be updating it often over the following weeks until all the following clips are published:

  • Jab + Cross + Right Kick (unloaded leg theory)
  • Right Kick Counter to the Jab + Cross (loaded leg theory)
  • Jab + Cross + Hook + Right Kick (loaded leg theory)
  • Overhand Right + Left Kick (loaded leg theory)
  • Left Kick Retaliation to Right Kick (loaded leg theory)
  • Draw Step Set Up for the Right Kick (loaded leg theory)
  • Swing Kick Counter to the Right Kick (neutral leg theory)
  • Outside Angle Kick Counter to the Jab + Cross (neutral leg theory)
  • Jab Set Up for the Outside Angle Kick (neutral leg theory)
  • Left Inside Leg Kick Set Up for the Right Kick or Outside Angle Kick (neutral leg Theory)
  • Calve Punt(neutral leg theory)
  • Over-Riding The System, Forearm Chop, Knee, Heel Kick from the Clinch
  • Forearm Smash Attack vs Guard Pass Prevention
  • Elbow Spike Guard Opener

Loaded vs Unloaded Leg Theory (Weight Bearing vs Non-Weight Bearing – Contracted Muscle vs Relaxed Muscle)

Jab, Cross, Right Leg Kick Combination

Leg Kick By Draw

Jab, Cross, Hook, Leg Kick Combination

Kicking the Rear Leg and Inside Leg Kicks

Right Kick Counter to the Jab, Cross Combination

Swing Kick Counter to the Thai Kick

Outside Leg Kick Counter to the Jab, Cross

Jab, Outside Leg Kick Combination

Inside to Outside Leg Kick Combination

Overriding The System for MMA

MMA Karate Chop Guard Retention Counter

Yamasaki MMA Elbow Spike Guard Opener

Speak Softly And Carry A Big Kick

I’m sure I’ve said it before, but I’m going to keep on saying it until the day I die. My favorite part of training in the Martial Arts is meeting the wonderful, high class people. Some of whom have become good friends of mine. Khuen Khru/Coach Alvin Chan out of Baltimore Maryland is one of them.

I first met Khru Alvin a number of years ago at the Pacific Northwest Muay Thai Camp. Later I would also see him at the CSW Fighter/Instructor Camp in CA each year. Alvin is a quiet and humble instructor but he really made an impression on me.

At the Thai Camp, we’d always start the mornings off with a 2 or 3 mile run at 6:30 am. Sometimes, by the third day, your legs would be so stiff it would take a good half hour just to stand up straight. Running or even moving for that matter seemed like a stretch of the imagination. At times like that, it was easy to slip into a fog, to just go through the motions and get the run and other exercises out of the way.

Khru Alvin, always made it out in front of me during the runs. He’d turn the corner and make the return trip to camp, but every time, without fail, he would look up from his concentrated gaze to give me a smile and slap fives as we passed during our shared journey of pain.

This always seemed to snap me out of my fatigue induced stupor and remind me that I chose to be wherever I was. I was among friends and we were bound together by a unique experience and the shedding of blood, sweat and tears. And then the world would open up. I would breath deeper, I would begin to smell the fresh mountain air, the semi-sweet tones of pine needles and ferns lacing it with their fragrance. I would remember what a wonderful opportunity I had to train with such incredible people in such an amazing an beautiful place.

Khuen Khru Alvin and I shooting for Damage Conrol MMA

Khuen Khru Alvin and I shooting for Damage Conrol MMA

Later, he would do the same for me on the runs on the sunny streets of California. More running, more fatigue, the same Khru Alvin, ahead of me on the runs, slapping fives, sharing a laugh, a tip, a technique. He would be there for me when I needed him most, right after being chewn up an spat out by the 185 lb. professional fighters, a familiar face in the room, a training partner and friend, a roll of refuge where I could let my guard down and just enjoy the roll.

He is such a great instructor and an inspiration to me. Quietly but tenaciously pursuing the secrets of the Martial Arts, wherever they may hide. I have found them in him. And here are a precious few. The Shin Across Defense to the Prumb, as well as the Elbow and Power Knee set ups from that position. Not a “Kick” per se but “Big” and well… you get the picture.

Thank you for everything Khuen Khru Alvin!